LulzSec wreaks Havoc

LulzSec emerged in the past few months, but has quickly gained the headlines away from Anonymous. It has gained attention due to its high profile targets and the sarcastic messages it has posted in the aftermath of its attacks. Everyone is a target and very few things are off limits. At one point, the group opened up a hotline where it took hacking requests. LulzSec first got noticed when it hacked the Web sites of Fox.com and PBS. It stole Fox employee passwords and posted them online. Since the PBS and Fox.com hacks, LulzSec has also targeted SonyPictures.com; FBI affiliated Web sites, Nintendo, Bethesda Softworks and other small gaming companies, Senate.gov, and the CIA, among others.

Recently, LulzSec released the emails and passwords of 62,000 average Web users, people who had their emails hacked, Facebook accounts defaced, and Amazon accounts charged. The majority of LulzSec’s messages are sent via Twitter @LulzSec. The group does not show any signs of slowing down, and news of new hacks or targets emerges every day. For the most part, Anonymous has targeted government sites and has not focused much on stealing and posting the confidential data of the average Web user. The same can’t be said for LulzSec.

LulzSec points out, much of the trouble stems from the fact that people tend to use the same password across multiple sites, whether they’re signing up for a newsletter or paying their credit card bill. If anything, these hacks should teach people to have multiple passwords for email, banking, credit cards, and online shopping. It can be difficult to remember multiple passwords, but it’s better than having a LulzSec supporter hack into your Facebook account and change your photo to something obscene.

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2 thoughts on “LulzSec wreaks Havoc

  1. Did we ever figure out who these people were? I remember there being one arrest, but wasn’t that the guy who ran their chat server, and had no real connection to the group?

    • A few of them have been arrested cross multiple countries. The last one I heard was a British teenager in late June. The FBI is still investigating them and the ‘Anonymous’ attacks on Paypal/Visa because of Wikileaks controversy last year.

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