Is privacy good or bad for liberty?

We were talking about this in last night’s class. It didn’t occur to me at the time but after dwelling on it for a while it hit me. There is NO liberty without privacy. Imagine a perfect world without privacy. What if I wanted to keep something to myself or have some privacy? I wouldn’t have the liberty to be because I couldn’t make that choice in such a world. Hence, there is no room for liberty. If everyone knew everything life would be a one way track, dull and repetitive. There would be no “new” ideas because all new things start off private. Privacy is without question integrated in our world whether we like it or not. To not protect it would go against everything it means to be human. We need to educate people the best we can to be ethical, without eliminating aspects of privacy. Sure you’re going to run some risks, like people keeping potentially hurtful or dangerous things private, but what’s the alternative? Without privacy we’d be no different than a rock or a tree. We’d be soulless.

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4 thoughts on “Is privacy good or bad for liberty?

  1. I wouldn’t go so far as to say that we would be soulless without privacy, but I certainly see what you mean. Liberty means that we are free to do things within reason, and privacy is certainly within reason. Without privacy, we wouldn’t be truly free to do things that we wanted to do, and thus we wouldn’t really have any liberties.

  2. I agree privacy is very important, and i think it is worth the risks. Of course if there was less privacy it would be easier for the police to solve investigations, and prevent bad things from happening. But I feel its worth accepting these risks and making the police work harder to solve cases to give everyone privacy in return.

  3. I think the way the world is headed now, we all will gradually lose more and more privacy unless a major movement is started to take some of that back.

  4. Privacy is important in that it allows people to believe in something, and not be ridiculed or ostracized for it. Correlating this to liberty, it gives you the freedom, the liberty, to believe what you want to believe; a very important freedom indeed.

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