Siri, the beloved iPhone companion’s speech recognition tool has been cracked.

The good people at Applidium decided to do a little reseach about Siri, the voice recognition technology behind Apple’s new iPhone 4S. Using tcpdump, they discovered that the technology is sending requests over to an apple server located here, at http://17.174.4.4.

They had a desire to look more into the protocol, so they make their own certificate and added it to their iPhone 4GS. Once that was done, they were seeing every time the iPhone sent a request, the request was being sent to their server and not the official iPhone server. From the information displayed in cleartext, they were able to view the protocol, and all fields associated with it.

So what was learned by this? Apple is very thorough with their technologies.  The iPhone sends your voice directly to the server for interpretation, and then the voice commands are sent back to the phone, along with a confidence score for every transcribed word. I can’t even speculate the value of this, but I’m sure there is some reason.

For the full article, and to download their tools for making your very own Siri server, visit their blog here:

http://applidium.com/en/news/cracking_siri/

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4 thoughts on “Siri, the beloved iPhone companion’s speech recognition tool has been cracked.

  1. You wold have to assume that would be the case. If there is transfer of information going on between the iPhone and the server you would assume there is a need for a network connection. That really diminishes the usability of Siri since you need a network connection at all time to use it.

  2. You had to figure that with new Apple technology there is always going to be someone that wishes to crack it. Apple is one of the biggest names in out world today and something as sophisticated as Siri was begging to be cracked. Also I saw that they tools that applidium wrote were written in a language they called Ruby. I’ve personally never heard of it b4 so im going to check it out. For anyone else that wants to look at it here is the home page.

    http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/

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