Five Year Old Beats Xbox Account Security

You’d think a company like Microsoft would have adequate security, especially for something like an Xbox account, which may have credit cards or other financial information tied to it.  A 5 year old in San Diego found out that he could bypass the password on his father’s account by entering a wrong password, and then, when the “Sorry, please try again” screen came up, he filled up the field with spaces and hit enter.  Somehow, this triggered a bug or a backdoor or something, and allowed access.  Since his father works in the computer security industry, he was able to give enough information about the flaw to Microsoft for it to be quickly fixed.  It is a bit worrying that the password could be bypassed so easily, and illustrates that even the most advanced system can be full of holes.

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-26879185

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8 thoughts on “Five Year Old Beats Xbox Account Security

  1. I heard about this story this kid will be a great hacker one day. this kid also bypassed a mobile toddler lock when he was 1 yrs old.

  2. I cannot believe that Microsoft let something like this through their security. A five year old hacking an Xbox Live account is pretty comical but also frightening for users.

  3. hahahaha!! That’s funny. Worrisome, but funny. It sounds like it might be some kind of buffer overload that overwrote some memory and changed the logic of the program. Or maybe it’s just a backdoor. I’m surprised it took this long for someone to find that.

  4. I think it is pretty cool to have people who are so smart in the world to end up doing things like this when they are very young. It is interesting to see where they end up in life.

  5. I think it’s pretty funny that something so simple was overlooked by Microsoft.

  6. Hard to believe this kid found the bug by himself. I read in another article that the kid was given a reward of $50, a year’s subscription to Xbox Live and four games, which is pretty cool.

  7. That’s a funny story but it shows that even products that everyone assumed were safe might have security problems.

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