Hackers Can Mess With Traffic Lights to Jam Roads and Reroute Cars

This article is about if you can actually hack the traffic system to reroute traffic. The system is comprised of magnetic sensors embedded in roadways that wirelessly feed data about traffic flow to nearby access points and repeaters, which in turn pass the information to traffic signal controllers. This system lacks basic security there is no encryption or authentication setup for this system. You could use a packet sniffer to easily capture the data. the data will be in plain text this data can be used to confuse the system to make it work improperly. This could be used maliciously to  cause  major accidents.  Nothing is being done by the company to fix this issue the vice president of the company Sensys Networks, Brian Fuller, told WIRED that the Department of Homeland Security was “happy with the system,” and that he had nothing more to add on the matter.

source: http://www.wired.com/2014/04/traffic-lights-hacking/

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23 thoughts on “Hackers Can Mess With Traffic Lights to Jam Roads and Reroute Cars

  1. Maybe they have something up their sleeves after die-hard came out im sure it would be a cause of concern

  2. If I could do this it certainly would help getting to work in summer mornings

    • I generally crash a brand new plane into my office every other day. When I’m not doing that I make international flights disappear

  3. I’ve also heard of people putting magnets on their bike frames to trigger the light changes, clearly this system is in need of a security overhaul. I think the sheer cost of that would probably outweigh the benefits in the minds of those in charge, at least until the death count rises enough for it to start costing them money. That’s probably when they’ll start paying attention.

    • That’s probably why they haven’t done any thing about this. It would cost so much money and time to change the sensors, and it’s not like everyone is just walking around messing with the traffic lights.

  4. I’ve also heard of people putting magnets on their bike frames to trigger the light changes, clearly this system is in need of a security overhaul. I think the sheer cost of that would probably outweigh the benefits in the minds of those in charge though.

  5. I believe that they should fix the security problems in these devices. I agree that the costs are probably very high. But maybe if they created a new version with better security?
    The chances of something bad happen are not very high but there is a chance, and for me that’s a reason to fix this issue.

  6. The government is fine with chances all it will take is one good attack ad then its an issue. To them there is no need to put money in something that doesn’t seem to be an issue

  7. If it’s so simple to interact with these devices, I’m confused as to why we haven’t heard about someone abusing this before. If these devices are indeed that easy to attack with the ability to change the lights with the click of a button then there is a serious problem.

  8. It’s crazy to think hackers are able to take over our living infrastructure.

    I know it wasn’t that long ago that we had the Stuxnet scare, but I think it’s critically important that we get rid of legacy infrastructure and move to more modern, less vulnerable software!

      • It’s not always about the money. If Microsoft wants to get rid of XP, then they should be required to at least offer free upgrades to government infrastructure.

  9. i Have noticed cameras being setup to catch drivers running a red light. so the state can mail traffic violation out and extort money from the general public. Does the state and the gov really care about our safety or they just worried about getting money for make sure their laws are being followed.

  10. the fact that nothing has been done by the company to fix this is ridiculous

  11. If you think about it, it is pretty scary to think that someone has found a way to hack traffic lights. I think the company should find a way to patch the system so it can’t be hacked.

  12. If you read this Professor Woelk, please note that I am trying and probably have surpassed a fair amount of comments. If you don’t respond to this I will assume that I have completed my job adequately and that no longer will I be tormented by the establishment (NSA look away). I have enjoyed our brief 15 weeks together, but, like all good things, it must come to an end.

  13. I think this is pretty scary because it’s so easy to sniff the packets and even edit them.

  14. If the traffic lights are really susceptible to people riding their bikes with magnets on them then, I think this is a problem that should really be handled.

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