Google Leaks 282,867 Hidden WHOIS Records

Google is taking some flack after a defect in Google Apps accidentally leaked a large number of customers’ domain registration WHOIS information. Over 282,000 domains registered using Google Apps for Work since mid 2013 have been exposed, opening up the potential that victims could become targets of spear phishing attacks, or even identity theft. The leak was first discovered by Cisco’s Talos Security Intelligence and Research Group on February 19, who quickly notified Google of their findings.

The attack exposes these customers’ names, phone numbers, email addresses, and even physical addresses. The alarming part of this leak is that the effected customers payed extra for a service that specifically keeps domain registration WHOIS information hidden from public view. Google was partnered with a company called eNom to mange domains registered by Google Apps for Work customers, and was tasked with maintaining the hidden WHOIS data. Domain registrants fell victim to this leak when their domains were automatically renewed the following year. eNom’s domain renewal system did not recognize that the domain registrant had previously payed for the unlisted WHOIS service, and went ahead and publicly renewed the domains with the hidden registrant information, allowing the WHOIS information to be archived in the public directory.

After being notified by Cisco Talos of the defect in Google Apps, Google patched it five days later. Strangely, Google waited until March 12th, almost three weeks later, to inform the effected customers that their WHOIS information had been leaked. Cisco Talos, in their public statement regarding the finding, encouraged effected customers to take the necessary actions to protect themselves from danger as a result of their domain registration being leaked. Actions recommended for victims include monitoring their email accounts for suspicious mail that might be highly sophisticated and targeted phishing attempts, as well as to monitor things that might indicate identity theft, such as credit scores or bank statements.


Sources:
https://threatpost.com/google-apps-defect-leaks-private-whois-data-of-280000/111624
http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/03/epic-google-snafu-leaks-hidden-whois-data-for-280000-domains/

Jarrod Manwaring

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