New DoubleLocker Ransomware Attacks Android Devices

Security researchers have discovered a new kind of ransomware for android that both changes the affected device’s PIN code and encrypts the files. It goes by the name DoubleLocker and is reported to use code from an old banking trojan called Svpeng. This was formerly one one of the more interesting pieces of android malware. It would overlay fake banking logins, steal money from bank accounts using sms account management, change PIN codes, and encrypt user files. Fortunately the DoubleLocker ransomware doesn’t attempt to steal any banking information. At least not yet.

DoubleLocker takes a new approach to ransomware, being the first of its kind to misuse Android’s accessibility service to gain admin rights. Once it is installed, usually through a fake flash player update, the app gives requests device accessibility permissions. If the user enables these, the app is able to simulate touches on the screen so it can make itself a device administrator and set itself as the default home app. This means that whenever the user presses the home button, the malware is re-launched. The app uses its administrator rights to change the PIN code on the phone and encrypt all of the user files to .cryeye files with a random key stored at a remote location.

doublelocker

Once running, the app shows a ransom request for 0.013 BTC (about $70) like this one, which when paid will remotely decrypt the phone and remove the PIN lock.

There are a few ways to protect yourself from these kinds of attacks. For one, Flash Player for mobile is dead so don’t be trying to update it. More generally, however, you should

  • Only install apps from trusted sources
  • Keep the “Unknown Sources” checkbox off unless you have a very good reason to turn it on. Always turn it back off right afterwards.
  • Keep an antivirus app on your smartphone

 

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~ Daniel Monteagudo