Under Armour: My FitnessPal Hack

On March 25, 2018, Under Armour was alerted of a breach that took place in February 2018. Under Armour notified the media, that 150 million MyFitnessPal user accounts were hacked from the breach of its database. However, since information like Social Security numbers and drivers license weren’t even asked for by the app, and since payment cards were processed separately, they were not stolen in the data breach. The stolen data consists of account usernames, as well as the email address associated with it and the hashed passwords. Meaning that though the passwords were obtained, they remained encrypted. The reason this is important to note is because, though the hackers have access to the above mentioned info, they still don’t have all the account passwords. Therefore, users still have time to change their passwords. Since many users use the same username and password across multiple sites and applications, it would be a good idea for them to change their passwords on their other accounts as well. Nevertheless, the risk still remains from this data breach. With the emails, the attackers are able to send phishing attacks to the user, making the email seem like its from the fitness app. Under Armour said it is working data security firms and law enforcement, but did not provide details on how the hackers got into its network or pulled out the data without getting caught in the act.

 

Sources:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-under-armour-databreach/under-armour-says-150-million-myfitnesspal-accounts-breached-idUSKBN1H532W

https://www.slashgear.com/under-armour-myfitnesspal-hack-5-things-to-know-30525418/

-Noor Mohammad

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The Rise of Fileless malware

Over the last two years, there has been an uptick in the amount the malware attacks that are fileless. This means that the malware is designed to not rely on or interacts with the filesystem of the host machine. This is so it is relatively undetectable by file scanning, which is the common way to find malware. This rising trend will change how we deal with these kind of malware threats. One of the changes to combat this threat is to turn to behavior based detection strategies like “script block logging,” which will keep track of code that is executed, for someone to sift through and look for abnormalities.

Experts are predicting that fileless malware attacks will continue to rise as it did from 2016 to 2017 because of its success rate. Fileless attacks are more likely to be successful than file-based attacks by an order of magnitude (literally 10 times more likely), according to the 2017 “State of Endpoint Security Risk” report from Ponemon. The ratio of fileless to file-based attacks grew in 2017 and is forecasted to continue to do grow this year. This goes to show that we need to constantly be adapting to different threats, because we know the hackers will.
– Ryne Krueger

 

https://www.technewsworld.com/story/85178.html

 

New Eurpoean Privacy Standards Comming into Effect

Two years ago the European Union passed the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), on May 25th these regulations become enforceable. The GDPR aims to increase the number of privacy controls users have on the web through new privacy standards. Although the regulations were specifically passed by the EU, due to the international nature of the web many people from all over the world will feel its impacts.

These regulations aim to increase user privacy through expanding the scope of consent that sites are required to request. First, consent has to be explicitly given for each specific use of data provided by a customer – meaning web services must implement gradual permission systems. The user must be told exactly what the data is being used for and has a right to access all the information the company has on the user. Companies must also have the ability to prove that consent was given for a particular use of data. Second, a user must be able to withdraw their consent at any time. Lastly, all users have the right to be forgotten. This final provision means that a user can request that any data associated with them to be permanently erased from a companies database.

It is unknown at this time how willing the EU will be to enforce these provisions. However, breaking any of these cars large penalties on per-violation bases. These rules could potentially change the global playfield as many advertising, social media, and other businesses that rely heavily on data collection will be massively affected.

https://www.theverge.com/2018/3/28/17172548/gdpr-compliance-requirements-privacy-notice

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/30/gdpr-everything-you-need-to-know.html

https://www.huntonprivacyblog.com/2017/12/15/article-29-working-party-publishes-guidance-on-consent-under-the-gdpr/

Why Healthcare Security Is So Prone To Attack – Verizon Report

We already know that health care is extremely vulnerable to cyberattacks relative to many other industries, but Verizon has just released a new cybersecurity report that reveals the true internal actors involved in the data breaches that target so many health organizations. The report emphasizes that the medical industry is the “only industry in which internal actors are the biggest threat to an organization” (Mukherjee). It states that 48% of these actors are motivated by financial gain, 31% by just the fun or curiosity of it, and 10% simply by convenience.

Improper employee practices and human error contribute to “threat actions” within health organizations due to inadequate delivery of personal health information, or getting rid of data in inappropriate ways— mainly because of the widespread use of paper documents and the failure to shred or properly dispose of them.

Healthcare workers have frequent and easy access to patients’ personal information, and the convenience and fun of committing fraud provide a main cause of data breaches in the medical industry. Verizon does provide solutions to help prevent such breaches of medical and financial information: create secure passwords, get rid of data efficiently, train employees not to fall for phishing emails with malicious software; but it warns that none of these potential threats are mutually exclusive.

Source:

http://fortune.com/2018/03/02/healthcare-cybersecurity-verizon-report/

Baltimore’s Dispatch System Taken Down

Baltimore’s 911 dispatch system was breached Sunday, March 25th, shutting down automatic dispatching until Monday, March 26th, as well as halting call logs from 9:54 a.m. Sunday to 7:42 a.m. Monday.

A server running the city’s computer-aided dispatch (CAD) system was infiltrated around 8:30 Sunday morning, forcing caller information to be relayed manually for the remainder of the day into Monday. Under normal circumstances, caller information appears on a map and the nearest first responders are dispatched automatically. The attack effectively slowed this process and demanded that call center staff relay this information to dispatchers themselves.

The exploited vulnerability was a port that had been left open after an IT team attempted to troubleshoot a communications issue and in the process made changes to the firewall. City workers were able to take the affected server offline, conduct a thorough investigation, and successfully bring it back online by approximately 2 a.m. Monday morning. Later reports confirmed that the attack did involve ransomware, but neither the ransom amount nor the city’s response to the ransomware has been stated.

-Jordan Sullivan

Sources: