Hacking group claims to offer cyberweapons in online auction

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Hackers going by the name Shadow Brokers said they will auction stolen surveillance tools that are linked to the U.S. National Security Agency.   The group said interested parties had to send funds in advance of winning the auction via Bitcoin currency and would not get their money back if they lost.  To arouse interest in the auction, the hackers released samples of programs they said could break into popular firewall software made by companies including Cisco Systems, Juniper Networks and Fortinet.  The companies did not respond to request for a comment and there was no response from the NSA.  The Shadow Brokers promised in postings on a Tumblr blog that the auctioned material would contain “cyberweapons” developed by the Equation Group, a hacking group that cybersecurity experts widely believe to be an arm of the NSA.

The Shadow Brokers said the programs they will auction will be “better than Stuxnet,” which is a  malicious computer worm.  Reuters could not contact the Shadow Brokers or verify their assertions. Some experts who looked at the samples posted on Tumblr said they included programs that had previously been described and therefore were unlikely to cause major damage.  Professionals stated that some of the data released was fairly old and even a couple years old in some cases.  Still, they appeared to be genuine tools that might work if flaws have not been addressed. Other security experts warned the posting could prove to be a scam.

You can find the whole article at

http://www.cnbc.com/2016/08/16/hacking-group-claims-to-offer-cyberweapons-in-online-auction.html

-Andrewvcsec

 

Canadian Point of Sale company data breech

     The point of sale company Lightspeed has suffered a data breech, the email above was posted on twitter by Australian security expert Troy Hunt which was sent by Lightspeed to its customers. The hackers had gained access to systems related to its retail offering. Lightspeed confirmed the attackers accessed a central database containing information on sales, products, and customers. The database included encrypted passwords, electronic signatures, and API keys. Eventhough the database was accessed by hackers Lightspeed said there was no evidence that information was stolen.

      The company said that passwords created after January of 2015 where the safest having been stored with advanced encryption technology. They also said that the system that the hackers had accessed did not hold any private information such as credit card numbers. The company has informed customers that a third party security firm had been hired to investigate and that it’s systems should be only accessible by authorized users.

http://www.securityweek.com/pos-vendor-lightspeed-suffers-data-breach

  • Gavin Millikan

New Rule 41 Allows FBI to Mass Hack

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An amendment to Rule 41 would allow the FBI to obtain a warrant from any court to hack multiple computers rather than from one with jurisdiction over the target’s location. All the FBI would have to do in order to get the warrant would be to prove the target is obscuring their location.

Therefore, the FBI would theoretically only need one warrant from anywhere in America to hack multiple computers all over the world. This is scary to think about. Tor users should be aware of this.

Some people seem to be not as worried stating that the FBI would still need probable cause. They also point out the logic in that it is hard to get a warrant to hack a computer if you cannot determine the computer’s location.

This will go into effect starting December 1st unless Congress blocks it.

Source: https://news.bitcoin.com/update-bitcoiners-use-tor-warned

– jar311

South Korea training students to hack for the military

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In an effort to boost it’s defenses, South Korea has enlisted 120 of it’s most talented programmers, offering full scholarships for 7 years of military service. Korea University’s national cyber-defense department will produce it’s first batch of graduates next year.

This program is just a part of a broader build-up though. South Korea is increasing the size of it’s cyber command to 1,000 people and increased information security spending by almost %50 between 2009 and 2015.

Unfortunately though, the South is racing to catch up. North Korea started training it’s hackers in the early 90’s and, according to the chief of S.K.’s defense security command, has 1,700 highly skilled and specialized hackers. He also called North Korea a ‘global cyber power.’

The South has been playing catch up for awhile actually, it wasn’t until a ‘suspected’ North Korean attack in 2009, that paralyzed a large number of government websites, that the South set up a cyber-defense command. In 2013 North Korean hackers attacked South broadcasters and banks. An estimated 32,000 computer servers were paralyzed, and the country lost an estimated 750 million dollars in economic damage.

Luckily South Korea seems to be training some excellent talent in their national cyber-defense department. This is shown by their students winning the ‘Hackers World Cup’ this year in August at Defcon in Las Vegas.

 

Robert Levasseur

http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2015/nov/30/young-programmers-in-s-korea-groomed-to/?f=business

Way to go VTech.

One month ago a hacker revealed that he had broken into the toymaker VTech and retrieved a lot of information that was disturbing. Apparently, VTech had been storing  images, chat logs, home addresses, emails, names, genders and even birthdays of every customer. This would include the parents and their children who the products were most likely being used by.  Around 4,000,000 parents and 200,000 of the children using the products information was readily available for anyone who knew what they were doing. The hacker did not relinquish the way he was able to break into VTech, probably in an attempt to keep this information secret from people who want it but do not know how to hack, but has commented that he retrieved 190GB worth of photos and shared 3832 images with motherboard, a blogging site, with all the faces blocked out.VTech has yet to concretely say what their exact reasoning was but the wording of their attempt to justify it was so that they can send the password to the user directly. You know because that is such a GREAT idea, instead of just having them reset their password every time they forgot it because the company made it entirely impossible for them to access it on their own and with ease, I will just send you it back. The person that thought this was a good idea should get fired, like, two years ago.

https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2015/12/01/photos-of-kids-and-parents-chatlogs-audio-files-stolen-in-vtech-breach/