BlueBorne, a Bluetooth Vulnerability

Armis has identified a new threat to almost every device we own. There are eight vulnerabilities that have been identified, four of which are critical. These vulnerabilities affect over 5 billion Android, Windows, iOS, and Linux devices. This vulnerability is known as BlueBorne.

What makes this vulnerability different than most cyber attacks is that there is no link that a user has to click on or a malicious file that the user has to download to become a victim. The user doesn’t even have to be connected to the internet. Instead, BlueBorne is spread through a devices Bluetooth connection. The attack doesn’t require the targeted device to be paired to the attackers device or even for the targeted device to be set to discoverable mode.

Image result for BlueBorne

This all contributes to BlueBorne being easily spread to devices at a possible unprecedented rate. Bluetooth processes have high privileges on all operating systems which allows this exploit to completely take over the device. Android devices are vulnerable to remote code execution, information leaks, and Man-in-The-Middle attacks. Windows devices are vulnerable to the Man-in-The-Middle attack. Linux devices running BlueZ are affected by the information leak vulnerability, and Linux devices from version 3.3-rc1 (released in October 2011) are affected by the remote code execution vulnerability (This includes many smart watches, smart tvs, and smart refrigerators). iPhone, iPad and iPod touch devices with iOS 9.3.5 and lower, and AppleTV devices with version 7.2.2 and lower are affected by the remote code execution vulnerability, but this vulnerability was already patched for users running iOS 10. Even networks that are “air gapped” are at risk of this attack, and includes industrial systems, government agencies, and critical infrastructure.

Examples of attacks:

  • Taking a picture on a phone and sending it to the hacker
  • Listening to a conversation through a wearable device
  • Redirecting a user to a fake login page to steal their login information
  • Cyber espionage
  • Data theft
  • Ransomware
  • Creating large botnets out of IoT devices

Many companies are pushing out updates for their users, but for many it is too late, and for others they have older devices that will not receive the updates.

As of 9/13/17:

  • Apple users with iOS 10 are safe
  • Google has released a patch for this vulnerability for Android Marshmallow and Nougat, but it might be weeks before the patch is available to some Android users
  • Microsoft patched the vulnerabilities in July
  • A patch for Linux is expected to be released soon

The problem is that even with these patches, there are many users who are unaware of this exploitation and/or do not update their devices regularly. For users that haven’t updated their devices or do not have an update for their device, the safest thing to do is to turn Bluetooth off on your phone and leave it off until there is a patch for your device

 

Source: https://www.armis.com/blueborne/

 

-Matthew Smith

Advertisements

“Equifax Data Breach Could Affect half the U.S. Population”

Equifax is a very large credit reporting company who has experienced a cyber attack over the summer. The attack was discovered on July 29 but didn’t become public information until last Thursday, the 5th of September. This data breach could have affected 143 million people. The information that was exposed includes social security numbers, address, and birthday information. Equifax is also saying 209,000 credit cards were exposed including some from the UK and Canada. A big problem with this attack is Equifax was a service used to protect from identity theft but now the integrity of the site has been compromised by this attack.

Once Equifax discovered the breach they began working with private security companies to figure out what happened and how they should go about fixing it. The FBI is also investigating the attack to try and find who is responsible. Another big problem with this breach is it could affect you even if you have never been a customer of Equifax. Equifax collects info. from credit card companies to create credit scores so it is possible your card is one of the ones exposed.

The hack has been reported to have been caused by a vulnerability from a “website application” Not much has been said on the details of the hack. Another problem has popped up from this attack. Equifax has created a website to enter your information and see if you have been exposed to this attack. According to George Weidman Founder of the security firm Shevirah “It’s teaching people entirely the wrong things about using the internet securely”. If this new website has vulnerabilities it could expose even more people.

-Levi Walker

Sources:

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/equifax-data-breach-49724230

https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/security/massive-equifax-data-breach-could-impact-half -s-population-n799686

Canadian Point of Sale company data breech

     The point of sale company Lightspeed has suffered a data breech, the email above was posted on twitter by Australian security expert Troy Hunt which was sent by Lightspeed to its customers. The hackers had gained access to systems related to its retail offering. Lightspeed confirmed the attackers accessed a central database containing information on sales, products, and customers. The database included encrypted passwords, electronic signatures, and API keys. Eventhough the database was accessed by hackers Lightspeed said there was no evidence that information was stolen.

      The company said that passwords created after January of 2015 where the safest having been stored with advanced encryption technology. They also said that the system that the hackers had accessed did not hold any private information such as credit card numbers. The company has informed customers that a third party security firm had been hired to investigate and that it’s systems should be only accessible by authorized users.

http://www.securityweek.com/pos-vendor-lightspeed-suffers-data-breach

  • Gavin Millikan

Smart Watch Security Threats

As with any piece of new technology, the introduction of smart watches come with new threats to security. A recent study was conducted on these watches and to no ones surprise, many vulnerabilities were found. A few of the vulnerabilities listed include, a lack of transport encryption, lack of user authentication, privacy problems, and firmware problems. It was also found that communications were easy to interfere with and intercept. This means that as of right now, if sensitive data is being transmitted over the watches, anyone could get a hold of it.

Experts recommend to protect sensitive information with strong passwords and to make sure you are controlling your communications to avoid middle man attacks. Another suggestion they make is to manage your transport layer security settings and make sure they are in good shape for protecting you. The biggest concern however seems to be the vulnerabilities of the apps rather than the watch itself. Previously there have been attacks on apps for the iPhone and such so the experts say it wouldn’t be surprising to see attacks on the smart watch apps.

The bottom line is to approach these new smart watch products with care and to focus more on the security of the apps than the watch itself. Additionally, as time goes on, more apps for increased security will be released. Apple has already released several since the release of their Apple Watch.

-Thomas Coburn

Security in Healthcare

According to a recent survey, Healthcare is the latest favourite of the hacking community. There’s a shortage of security professionals in the healthcare business, and while many respondents involved in tech are worried about personal records and other data, the ones who aren’t involved in tech, while worried, do not believe their corporations to have been hit.

The tech respondents have a right to be worried. Recently, it’s come to light that Healthcare experiences 340% more security attacks and incidents than any other sector, and advanced malware is suspected in 1 of every 600 attacks, making Healthcare four times more likely to be hit by advanced malware than any other sector.

There are many ways that hackers can get in. With the digitalization of patient records, as well as the addition of wearable technology, such as smart watches and smartphones, hackers are finding many new avenues to break into the system. While security for wearable technology is a separate issue, Jonathan Collins, a principal analyst for ABI Research says that they can pave the way for easier access to Healthcare records.

By Kathleen H. Justen

http://www.technewsworld.com/story/82638.html