Iranian Hackers Steal Academic Research Papers From Over 70 Universities

By: Brent Burgess                                                                                                                9/18/201

Around three weeks ago SecureWorks, a cybersecurity research group, discovered a massive phishing scheme that has been recently targeting many universities. This phishing attack has targeted over 76 universities in 14 countries, including Australia, Canada, China, Israel, Japan, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Most of these spoof sites had domains which attempted to replicate the universities’ library pages, getting access to accounts attempting to enter their library resources, and obtaining 31 terabytes of academic knowledge. When the information was entered, they were redirected to the actual university library site where they either were signed in or asked to repeat their credentials. The 16 domains were created between May and August of this year. Many of these stolen research papers were then sold by texting an encrypted message to WhatsApp or Telegram.

These phishing attacks were found to be perpetrated by the Cobalt Dickens hacking group which has been found to be closely associated with the Iranian government. In March of this year, the United States had indicted the Mabna hacking group and nine members in connection with the group. This group’s previous attacks appeared to have the same infrastructure as the Cobalt Dickens attacks, implying some of the same members were involved. These universities which create cutting-edge research are high priority targets due to the value of their information presents as well as the difficulty of securing them. This hack has taken place shortly after the United States decided to re-establish economic sanctions with the United States implying a potential political motivation.

“This widespread spoofing of login pages to steal credentials reinforces the need for organizations to incorporate multi-factor authentication using secure protocols and          implement complex password requirements on publicly accessible systems.”                  -SecureWorks

Sources:

https://www.zdnet.com/article/iran-hackers-target-70-universities-in-14-countries/ https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1017903/US-sanctions-Iran-hackers-nuclear-power-cybersecurity-donald-trump/                                    https://www.securityweek.com/iranian-hackers-target-universities-large-attack-campaign-secureworks                                                https://www.secureworks.com/blog/back-to-school-cobalt-dickens-targets-universities

 

 

Cryptocurrency mining malware, Ransomware, and who is at risk

By: Chase Alexander

9/11/2018

It is no secret that hackers are trying to gain something when they carry out an attack on a target, usually money. However the way that they do this can vary. It does not always mean that they are stealing credit card information, or bank account logins. Another way to exploit hacked targets is through cryptocurrency mining malware. There is also malware that takes over a system until a ransom is paid. Today I would like to look at three things. Ransomware, cryptocurrency mining malware, and who is at the greatest risk for these kinds of attacks.

First I am going to examine ransomware. This is an interesting case, as it has been around for quite some time now. The attack method dates all the way back to 2016. You would think that they would have been stopped by now, and you would be somewhat correct. Gone are the days of spreading ransomware through spam emails and outbreaks, where the philosophy was to cast a net as wide as possible and see what we catch. Today ransomware exists as a targeted attack on an individual or specific group. The goal of doing ransomware attacks this way is to carry out one strong attack, which will yield more reward then many weaker attacks. So how do they work? You gain entry into a system via weak Remote desktop protocol passwords. Escalate your privileges up to administrator. Use your new privileges to overcome security software. Spread your ransomware to encrypt files on the system. Finally leave a message with the ultimatum,” If you want your files to be decrypted, contact via email or dark web website.” And then you wait. If they pay the ransom, then mission success for the hacker. If they do not pay the ransom then it is almost inconsequential to the hacker. They will just move onto the next target and try again.

The other form of attack that is of interest is a cryptocurrency mining malware. What this attack does is take over a machine and use it to mine cryptocurrency for a hacker. This attack is very different because it requires no interaction between the hacker and the hacked. Unlike the previous method, this one allows the hacker to try and remain undetected. For ransomware, the hacked has the choice to either give up their machine and data, or give into the hacker. This method though gives no choice to the hacked. If they don’t hear their computer fan operating louder, then they will have no idea that they have been hacked. In addition to these facts, cryptocurrency is effectively an unregulated currency. This means that once the hacker has it, they are in the clear. If a hacker were to steal bank account credentials, there are still difficulties with actually attaining the currency inside of those bank accounts. A problem with this method however is that the profits are not immediate, they take time to incur. If ransomware is successful, then profits are made instantly.

So who is at risk for these attacks? Ransomware attacks are targeted attacks. They go after one group or individual. That group or individual will have to give up money in order to secure themselves. It is as simple as this; if you do not have money or credit, you are at a very low risk of this attack. The goal of ransomware is to get ransom. A hacker will go after someone who they know will be able to pay ransom. They are not going to go after the poor because they have very little to offer. A cryptomining attack however can happen to anybody. You don’t need any money or credit, if you have a computer it can be used for mining cryptocurrency. In terms of large targets we can look at Vietnam. Last year malware cost Vietnam 12.3 trillion VND or the equivalent of 540 million USD.

 

Sources:

  1. https://e.vnexpress.net/news/news/vietnam-vulnerable-as-new-cyber-security-threat-emerges-3804240.html
  2. https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2018/09/11/the-rise-of-targeted-ransomware/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+nakedsecurity+%28Naked+Security+-+Sophos%29
  3. https://www.zdnet.com/article/cryptocurrency-mining-malware-why-it-is-such-a-menace-and-where-its-going-next/

Third Major Vulnerability in Intel Chips This Year

Researchers from KU Leuven, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, University of Adelaide, and the University of Michigan collaborated to discover the third major vulnerability in Intel CPUs this year. They named it Foreshadow. Foreshadow is similar to two attacks that were discovered earlier this year — Spectre and Meltdown.

To explain briefly, Spectre, Meltdown, and Foreshadow are all vulnerabilities that result from hardware issues. Nearly every processor made by Intel after the year 1995, that utilizes out-of-order execution is vulnerable to Meltdown. Spectre is a vulnerability that is based on exploiting the side effects of speculative execution — an optimization technique which speeds up computer operations by doing tasks in advance that may or may not be necessary. Meltdown looks into memory (L1, L2, L3, RAM) and Spectre tricks programs into leaking information. Patches have been released for these vulnerabilities, but it is not a fix and may (will) decrease system performance. Example of meltdown: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbHbFkh6eeE

Foreshadow is a new vulnerability that affects Intel chips made after 2015. It affects CPUs that have the Software Guard Extensions feature (SGE). SGE allows programs to create “Lock Boxes” in Intel chips that the operating system cannot access. This means that even if your computer is infected with malware, it cannot access information that is guarded by SGE

 

“But we discovered we could specifically target a lock box within Intel’s processors. It would let you leak any data you want out of these secure enclaves.”

— Prof Thomas Wenisch from the University of Michigan

 

Intel stated that there have been no reports of these vulnerabilities being used by hackers. There are far more obvious and easier approaches to hacking. Nevertheless, this highlights the importance to stick to safety procedures such as regularly updating and patching. There will always be errors and vulnerabilities in systems, hardware, and initial design. The longer you operate on older versions, the longer the hackers have to discover and make use of those vulnerabilities.

– Cheng Ye

Sources:

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/intel-foreshadow-exploit-how-to-protect-yourself-from-latest-chip-vulnerability/

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-45191697?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/topics/cz4pr2gd85qt/cyber-security&link_location=live-reporting-correspondent

https://meltdownattack.com/

Pompeo Discusses Cyber Security at the State Department

Former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson eliminated the cyber security position at the State Department about one month ago. Tillerson eliminated this position in hopes to form “a bureau focused on economic and business affairs.” This act disappointed many members of the US government, and eventually resulted in President Trump replacing Tillerson with the current CIA director Mike Pompeo. John Sullivan will serve as Secretary of State until the US Senate confirms Pompeo’s approval.

Shortly after President Trump fired Tillerson, the CIA began to put more resources into cyber security. Last Thursday, CIA Director Mike Pompeo said, “I can only say that, every element of government has a piece of its cyber duty. It’s one of the challenges that is so deeply divided, that we don’t have a central place to do cyber work.” Many believe the removal of the cyber security position at the State Department foreshadows the US not engaging in foreign affairs with cyber security. Fortunately, numerous state officials have insisted that cyber security remains a top priority at the state department. Pompeo has not given any information to his decision on the cyber security position.

-Spencer Fleming

Source : http://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/382882-pompeo-pressed-on-plans-for-cyber-at-state

The Rise of Fileless malware

Over the last two years, there has been an uptick in the amount the malware attacks that are fileless. This means that the malware is designed to not rely on or interacts with the filesystem of the host machine. This is so it is relatively undetectable by file scanning, which is the common way to find malware. This rising trend will change how we deal with these kind of malware threats. One of the changes to combat this threat is to turn to behavior based detection strategies like “script block logging,” which will keep track of code that is executed, for someone to sift through and look for abnormalities.

Experts are predicting that fileless malware attacks will continue to rise as it did from 2016 to 2017 because of its success rate. Fileless attacks are more likely to be successful than file-based attacks by an order of magnitude (literally 10 times more likely), according to the 2017 “State of Endpoint Security Risk” report from Ponemon. The ratio of fileless to file-based attacks grew in 2017 and is forecasted to continue to do grow this year. This goes to show that we need to constantly be adapting to different threats, because we know the hackers will.
– Ryne Krueger

 

https://www.technewsworld.com/story/85178.html