Burgerville’s data breach

At some point in 2017 or 2018, the restaurant chain Burgerville experienced a security breach. The only way Burgerville learned of the issue is when the FBI notified them on August 22 of this year. At first, it was seen as a “brief intrusion that no longer existed”. However by September 19, (almost a whole month later), the company realized that the breach was active, and was targeting customer’s financial information. Burgerville does not specify what kind of malware it was or where it was detected, though the source article adds that it could be at a point-of-sale system, where people physically swipe/scan/insert their cards.

Data that was stolen includes credit/debit card information: names, card numbers, expiration dates, and CVV security numbers. Burgerville also does not know how many people could have been affected by this, though they warn everyone who used cards from September 2017 through September 2018 to watch their accounts for false purchases. Anyone who used a card to purchase anything at any one of their locations during the last year can have their credit info compromised.

“This was a sophisticated attack in which the hackers effectively concealed all digital traces of where they have been,” states Burgerville. Although no direct evidence was given, the data breach is attributed to Fin7, also known as Carbanak group, another Eastern European hacking network that has successfully done cyberattacks on over 100 US companies.

In August, three Ukrainian members of Fin7 were arrested in Europe, where Fin7 is believed to operate. Despite the arrests, Fin7 is still actively deploying malware on corporate networks. According to the US Department of Justice, this is not the first time Fin7 has targeted a US restaurant chain. Other victims include Chipotle Mexican Grill, Chili’s, Arby’s, Red Robin, and Jason’s Deli.

Although the chain made the initial mistake of underestimating the breach, they pulled in an external cybersecurity company to stop the breach, remove malware, and take preventative measures. “The operation had to be kept confidential until it was completed in order to prevent the hackers from creating additional covert pathways into the company’s network,” Burgerville said in a written statement. Burgerville completed the operation to seal the breach on September 30.

Source articles: 

https://www.zdnet.com/article/burgerville-customer-credit-card-info-stolen-in-data-breach-laid-at-fin7s-feet/

https://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2018/10/burgerville_reports_major_cred.html

 

Michael Abdalov

Fired Chicago Schools Employee Causes Data Breach

Recently, a temporary worker at Chicago Public Schools was fired from her job and is alleged to have stolen a personal database in retaliation. The personal database contained the information of approximately 70,000 people. The information which was stolen included, names, employee ID numbers, phone numbers, addresses, birth dates, criminal histories, and any records associating individuals with the Department of Children and Family services.

She allegedly copied the database then proceeded to delete it from the Chicago Public School’s system. Those affected by this breach included employees, volunteers and others affiliated with Chicago Public Schools. Luckily, the breach was discovered before any information was used or spread in any way by the former employee. The individual is now being charged with one felony count of aggravated computer tampering/disrupting service and four counts of identity theft.

This incident is an example of a very essential part of computer security, no matter how many security measures are put in place to guard a system somebody, like a disgruntled employee, can still cause a security breach. The lesson to be learned is to keep a close eye on employees, especially those which show red flags, and to be careful what data/databases certain employees are authorized to use, view and modify.

Written by: Craig Gebo

Source: https://www.securitymagazine.com/articles/89553-fired-chicago-schools-employee-causes-data-breach

Adult Sites Database Breached

 

In fairly recent news, eight adult websites had their databases breached and downloaded to a total file size of 98 megabytes. Now judging from that number, one could assume that this is not the most large-scale breach however it is still relevant. What was breached is as follows, IP addresses of users, hashed passwords, names and 1.2 million unique email addresses. Robert Angelini, the man behind it all claims that the figure is inaccurate as the website had only somewhere to the tune of 100k posts on it. The site has been since taken down for maintenance until the security vulnerability is fixed. He urges users to change their passwords. It is said that if the website cannot be secured then it will remain down forever.

Capture

This breach is compared to the breach of Ashley Madison in that the users could be blackmailed due to the nature of the website. The nature of the website of course being to post naked pictures of one’s spouse which is definitely of questionable ethics. The difference of course being the scale of the breach with Ashley Madison dumping 36 million users.

For those who have been breached, there are similar takeaways from other breaches, change your password and please don’t reuse passwords. Blackmail could be avoided by signing up for services like this with a disposable email account . Also, the password hashes that were dumped were hashed with Descrypt, a hash function created in 1979. A password hash posted to twitter by Troy Hung, the guy behind https://haveibeenpwned.com/ was cracked in 7 minutes by hashcat. In conclusion this illustrates the risks people may not know that they are putting themselves at by putting personal information on insecure websites.

– Loudon Mehling

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2018/10/hack-on-8-adult-websites-exposes-oodles-of-intimate-user-data/

 

 

Critical Flaws Found in Amazon FreeRTOS IoT Operating System

Link

A researcher has found large flaws in the leading Real-Time Operating System, FreeRTOS. This leaves a large number of Internet of Things devices vulnerable to attack. This affects devices from refrigerators to pacemakers. Last year, Amazon took over project management and upgraded the OS for their own Amazon FreeRTOS IoT operating system. They enhanced the OS for use with their own products in the future.

There are a total of 13 vulnerabilities in FreeRTOS’s TCP/IP stack, which affect the Amazon FreeRTOS as well. These issues let hackers do just about anything they want to the target device, from executing their own code to leaking memory information. The technical details of the flaws have not been revealed to the public in order to protect the development of a fix.

-Max Swank

Facebook User Data Stolen In Hack. Facebook Offers No Protection.

In a recent breach of Facebook it is suspected that approximately 29 million users had their data stolen, with the most severely affected being a group of 14 million. The attack is currently being attributed to spammers pretending to be a digital marketing firm. According to Facebook, Data stolen includes: “username, gender, locale/language, relationship status, religion, hometown, self-reported current city, birthdate, device types used to access Facebook, education, work, the last 10 places they checked into or were tagged in, website, people or pages they follow, and the 15 most recent searches”. News of the hack first surfaced on October 5th when it was suspected that 50 million users were affected, a number that has since been lowered.

Facebook first shared details of the attack last week, fearing as many as 50m people had been affected

Usually, companies in such a predicament offer access to credit protection agencies and other methods of identity theft prevention like in the case of the 2013 Target breach. However, Facebook declared that it would not be taking such steps, and would instead direct users to help pages where they could learn how to avoid phishing. Experts worry about the potential for smaller scale attacks. Joseph Lorenzo Hall, chief technologist at the Center for Democracy and Technology, believes that though no financial data was captured, information gathered could still be used in knowledge based authentication to break into accounts. He believes that the best move for Facebook would be to offer free access to password managers and other similar software to help combat this.

In Europe, the breach is costing Facebook about $1.6 billion, or 4% of its yearly revenue. This case is being recognized as the first major test of the General Data Protection Regulation which was enacted in May.

  • Nicholas Antiochos

Sources:

https://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-thinks-spammers-responsible-hack-stole-info-from-29-million-users-2018-10

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-45845431?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/topics/cz4pr2gd85qt/cyber-security&link_location=live-reporting-correspondent